Remove the tail meat from the langoustines. Make a seafood stock: boil waste of the langoustines, carrots, leek, celery and onion in about 2 liters of water. Add some bay leaf and a glass of white wine. Cook for at least half an hour. Press the stock through a sieve and that literally: as much of the cooking liquid as possible must be squeezed out. Let the sieved stock reduce for another fifteen minutes. Season further with a pinch of cayenne pepper and a generous splash of Cognac. Make a light roux (butter and flour) and lengthen it with the stock until you have a smooth soup. Mix in a few drops of cream. You now have a bisque of langoustines. You can fill a shot glass for each guest.
langoustines carrots leek celery onion laurel white wine cayenne pepper Cognac cream flowing flour puff pastry eggs
Belgian Cuisine

taste and tradition

Make puff pastry sticks. Cut long narrow strips from a sheet of puff pastry, brush with egg yolk and sprinkle with coarse salt. Bake them in an oven at 185°C until golden brown. The tomato jelly: mix fresh tomatoes in the blender and strain. Season with salt, pepper and allspice d'Espelette. Warm until lukewarm. Mix with soaked gelatin leaves and pour the preparation into individual bowls. Allow to cool and set. Make puree from cooked Jerusalem artichokes with butter, pepper, salt and nutmeg. Fry the langoustine tails in olive oil with garlic and parsley. Season with allspice d'Espelette. On the dinner plate: a lukewarm quenelle Jerusalem artichoke puree on the tomato jelly and a langoustine tail on top. Finish with chives, grated hard-boiled egg, coarse sea salt and allspice. Place a puff pastry stem over the plate. In addition, put a shot glass of warm langoustine bisque.
coarse sea salt fresh tomatoes gelatin sheets Jerusalem artichoke butter pepper sea salt nutmeg allspice éspelette chives olive oil garlic parsley

langoustines with tomato jelly

Creative Cooking the fiery passion
Remove the tail meat from the langoustines. Make a seafood stock: boil waste of the langoustines, carrots, leek, celery and onion in about 2 liters of water. Add some bay leaf and a glass of white wine. Cook for at least half an hour. Press the stock through a sieve and that literally: as much of the cooking liquid as possible must be squeezed out. Let the sieved stock reduce for another fifteen minutes. Season further with a pinch of cayenne pepper and a generous splash of Cognac. Make a light roux (butter and flour) and lengthen it with the stock until you have a smooth soup. Mix in a few drops of cream. You now have a bisque of langoustines. You can fill a shot glass for each guest.
langoustines carrots leek celery onion laurel white wine cayenne pepper Cognac cream flowing flour puff pastry eggs
Creative Cooking the fiery passion menu privacy policy
Ingredients Directions
Make puff pastry sticks. Cut long narrow strips from a sheet of puff pastry, brush with egg yolk and sprinkle with coarse salt. Bake them in an oven at 185°C until golden brown. The tomato jelly: mix fresh tomatoes in the blender and strain. Season with salt, pepper and allspice d'Espelette. Warm until lukewarm. Mix with soaked gelatin leaves and pour the preparation into individual bowls. Allow to cool and set. Make puree from cooked Jerusalem artichokes with butter, pepper, salt and nutmeg. Fry the langoustine tails in olive oil with garlic and parsley. Season with allspice d'Espelette. On the dinner plate: a lukewarm quenelle Jerusalem artichoke puree on the tomato jelly and a langoustine tail on top. Finish with chives, grated hard-boiled egg, coarse sea salt and allspice. Place a puff pastry stem over the plate. In addition, put a shot glass of warm langoustine bisque.
coarse sea salt fresh tomatoes gelatin sheets Jerusalem artichoke butter pepper sea salt nutmeg allspice éspelette chives olive oil garlic parsley
Belgian Cuisine taste and tradition

langoustines

with tomato jelly